Tumör

When doctors speak of tumours, it does not necessarily equate to cancer. In fact, in Latin ‘tumor’ refers to a lump, swelling or growth – in other words, an increase in the volume or a tissue. A distinction must then be made between benign and malignant tumours. Benign tumours do not form metastases (so-called ‘secondary tumours’) but instead separate from healthy cells and do not attack them. However, malignant tumours form metastases, invades healthy tissue cells and destroys them. Cancer is only spoken of in the context of malignant tumours. Whereas benign tumours can be easily removed for good due to their distinction from healthy tissue, malignant tumours are more difficult to remove and have a high likelihood of growing back. Once doctors discover a malignant tumour, it must be first be determined what kind of cancer is present, as this has an influence on the kind of treatment that will be undertaken. For precise diagnoses, we offer the following rapid tests in the field of oncology. They are intended for the detection of antigens against bladder cancer, haemoglobin, prostate-, breast- lung- and gastrointestinal cancers.

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